4 ways to reconnect with your inner child at Denmark’s favourite playground

4 ways to reconnect with your inner child at Denmark’s favourite playground

There’s no age limit to loving the creative bricks.

Destinations

1. Playing is good for you

The name Lego derives from an abbreviation of “play well” in Danish – leg godt. Learning through play is one of the main ethoses of the company as playing can be central to the way that a child learns to interact with the world. For older devotees, building with Lego is an absorbing alternative to online pursuits, or a distinct art form.

2. Yes, you can have Legos for lunch

To order food at Lego Gourmet, one selects tiny bricks of different colours and sizes to represent different items on the menu and inserts them into a table-top device.  When the order is ready, two robots sort meals in colour-coded brick boxes and deliver them to the canteen.

Four experience zones are colour coded: red for creative skills, blue for cognitive skills, green for social skills, and yellow for emotional skills.

3. Sweet dreams, Lego-style

Two hotels cater for those who seek a more immersive Lego experience, the Legoland Hotel and a new arrival, the Lego Castle Hotel with its colour-themed wizard and knight wings.

4. The Lego therapy

“There are plenty of adult fans of Lego – AFOLs. It’s a kind of therapy, building in Lego,” says model shop assistant Morten Gravgaard, whose job it is to repair, replace, and build new Lego models in Miniland, the enchanting ­miniature re-creation of towns and cities that is probably the Legoland’s most famous attraction.

 

“There are plenty of adult fans of Lego – AFOLs. It’s a kind of therapy, building in Lego.”

Text Tim Bird
Photos Tim Bird, Lego House, iStock

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